By 2050 our current food system will not feed the world population. The power of your philanthropy allows the best and brightest scientists to uncover innovative and transformative discoveries to feed the world. Every dollar of your support could be the turning point in one of the biggest challenges of our time.

SUPPORT FFAR TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO NUTRITIOUS

FOOD GROWN ON THRIVING FARMS.

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FFAR’s Impact

FFAR focuses on research that yields tangible results and impact. Our work has the potential to truly transform the current food system, ensuring that future generations have access to nutritious food.

$173 million invested in food and agriculture projects

70 universities and nonprofits performing game-changing research

$9 million invested in early career scientists

Millions of lives impacted around the world

FFAR’s Model

FFAR has a flexible and nimble model that makes it exceptionally positioned to facilitate the unique partnerships necessary to fund research in the pre-competitive space.

By bringing together experts from the academic, public, private, and non-governmental sectors together, it enables discussion and discovery to offer solutions to our increasingly unstable food system. With FFAR’s unique connections to the public sector as well as its dedication to innovation, the potential to impact the world of food and agriculture is limitless.

FFAR seeks contributors to help leverage the $200M provided by the 2014 Farm Bill. FFAR can match $1 for $1 contributions made directly to FFAR by non-federal, external public, private and non-profit sector contributors to support programs and activities. By partnering in support of FFAR’s mission, you join us in tackling today’s challenges in food and agriculture. Your involvement will directly support the nation’s investment in applicable and cutting-edge research.

By investing with FFAR you become a central partner in essential agricultural research and development.


FFAR received the 2020 Gold Seal of Transparency from GuideStar, the world’s largest source of information on non-profit organizations. FFAR’s 2020 Gold Seal recognizes our commitment to transparency, scientific rigor and collaboration. We are dedicated to providing in-depth information on FFAR financials and impact to our donors.

Kashyap Choksi, Ph.D.

To learn more about FFAR’s mission contact

kchoksi@foundationfar.org
Overcoming Water Scarcity

Overcoming Water Scarcity

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Agriculture uses 70 percent of the world’s accessible freshwater. FFAR’s 2016-2018 Overcoming Water Scarcity Challenge Area addressed water use efficiency in agriculture by developing water conservation and reuse technologies, improving crop and livestock breeds, creating improved agronomic practices, increasing the social and economic tractability of conservation practices and enhancing the efficacy of Extension services.

FFAR’s Sustainable Water Management Challenge Area builds on earlier work to increase water availability and water efficiency for agricultural use, reduces agricultural water pollution and develops water reuse technologies.

Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms

Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms

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FFAR’s 2016-2018 Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms Challenge Area increased soil health by building knowledge, fueling innovation, and enabling adoption of existing or new innovative practices that improve soil health.

The Soil Health Challenge Area advances existing research and identifies linkages between farm productivity and soil health, while also addressing barriers to the adoption of soil health practices.

Protein Challenge

Protein Challenge

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FFAR’s 2016-2018 Protein Challenge Area sought to improve the environmental, economic and social sustainability of diverse proteins.

The Advance Animal Systems challenge area supports sustainable animal production through environmentally sound productions practices and advancement in animal health and welfare. Additionally, the Next Generation Crops Challenge Area develops non-traditional crops, including plant-based proteins, and creates new economic opportunities for conventional crops to increase future crop diversity and farm profitability.

Food Waste and Loss

Food Waste and Loss

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About 40 percent of food in the US, or $161 billion each year, is lost or wasted. FFAR’s 2016-2018 Food and Waste Loss Challenge Area addressed the social, economic and environmental impacts from food waste and loss through research that developed of novel uses for agricultural waste, improved storage and distribution, supported tracking and monitoring, minimized spoilage through pre- and post-harvest innovations and changed behaviors to reduce food waste

FFAR’s current Health-Agriculture Nexus Challenge Area addresses food waste and loss and supports innovative, systems-level approaches to reduce food and nutritional insecurity and improve human health in the US and globally.

Forging the Innovation Pathway to Sustainability

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Supporting innovation is necessary for sustainable results. Over the last 50 years, farmers have tripled global food production thanks to agricultural innovations. Forging the Innovation Pathway to Sustainability was a 2016-2018 Challenge Area that focused on understanding the barriers and processes that prevented the adoption of technology and research results into sustainable practices.

Urban Food Systems

Urban Food Systems

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The 2016-2018 Urban Food Systems Challenge Area addressed feeding urban populations through urban and peri-urban agriculture and augmenting the capabilities of our current food system.

The Urban Food Systems Challenge Area continues this work and enhances our ability to feed urban populations.

Making My Plate Your Plate

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FFAR’s 2016-2018 Making My Plate Your Plate Challenge Area focused on helping Americans meet the USDA 2015 Dietary Guideline recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption, including research to both produce and provide access to nutritious fruits and vegetables.

FFAR’s current Health-Agriculture Nexus Challenge Area supports innovative, systems-level approaches to reduce food and nutritional insecurity and improve human health in the US and globally.