Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research Names Julie Reynes Chief Operating Officer

Reynes Brings Twenty-Year Track Record of Successful Nonprofit Leadership

JER Close UpThe Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, a nonprofit organization that addresses today’s food and agriculture challenges through innovative science, today named Julie Reynes Chief Operating Officer (COO). Effective immediately, Reynes assumes oversight of operational and administrative functions and reports directly to Executive Director Sally Rockey, Ph.D.

Acting COO Katy Raymond will continue in her role as Director of Strategic Planning.

As a self-employed entrepreneur over the past six years, Reynes has contributed to the success of more than 10 organizations in the Washington, D.C. area, through leadership as interim CEO at several nonprofits and as Founder and CEO of her own food company.

“We’re extraordinarily pleased to have Julie, an individual steeped in executive experience, join the rapidly evolving Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research,” said Executive Director Sally Rockey. “Julie’s effective leadership and unique combination of nonprofit and startup experience will strengthen the Foundation’s business operations and lay the groundwork for continued development.”

Reynes has held a variety of executive positions in the health, science and technology nonprofit sectors, including Vice President of International Services at American Red Cross. There, she established the organization’s first grants-based approach to disaster response.

As the first President of Patient Access Network Foundation, a nonprofit organization supporting cancer and chronic disease patients, Reynes established initial policies and procedures, cultivated donor relationships and developed a strategic plan.

In the food sector, Reynes founded and built Julie’s Datery, a startup manufacturer and wholesaler of stuffed dates. She led all aspects of brand-building, finance, and operations and expanded product availability to eight states and 85 stores in two years.

“It’s exciting to find such a unique organization where my diverse experience is valuable and where I will continue to learn,” said Reynes. “The innovative Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research has an important mission in our challenging and fast-changing food and agriculture environment.”

Meet Julie

Overcoming Water Scarcity

Overcoming Water Scarcity

Continue

Agriculture uses 70 percent of the world’s accessible freshwater. FFAR’s 2016-2018 Overcoming Water Scarcity Challenge Area addressed water use efficiency in agriculture by developing water conservation and reuse technologies, improving crop and livestock breeds, creating improved agronomic practices, increasing the social and economic tractability of conservation practices and enhancing the efficacy of Extension services.

FFAR’s Sustainable Water Management Challenge Area builds on earlier work to increase water availability and water efficiency for agricultural use, reduces agricultural water pollution and develops water reuse technologies.

Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms

Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms

Continue

FFAR’s 2016-2018 Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms Challenge Area increased soil health by building knowledge, fueling innovation, and enabling adoption of existing or new innovative practices that improve soil health.

The Soil Health Challenge Area advances existing research and identifies linkages between farm productivity and soil health, while also addressing barriers to the adoption of soil health practices.

Protein Challenge

Protein Challenge

Continue

FFAR’s 2016-2018 Protein Challenge Area sought to improve the environmental, economic and social sustainability of diverse proteins.

The Advance Animal Systems challenge area supports sustainable animal production through environmentally sound productions practices and advancement in animal health and welfare. Additionally, the Next Generation Crops Challenge Area develops non-traditional crops, including plant-based proteins, and creates new economic opportunities for conventional crops to increase future crop diversity and farm profitability.

Food Waste and Loss

Food Waste and Loss

Continue

About 40 percent of food in the US, or $161 billion each year, is lost or wasted. FFAR’s 2016-2018 Food and Waste Loss Challenge Area addressed the social, economic and environmental impacts from food waste and loss through research that developed of novel uses for agricultural waste, improved storage and distribution, supported tracking and monitoring, minimized spoilage through pre- and post-harvest innovations and changed behaviors to reduce food waste

FFAR’s current Health-Agriculture Nexus Challenge Area addresses food waste and loss and supports innovative, systems-level approaches to reduce food and nutritional insecurity and improve human health in the US and globally.

Forging the Innovation Pathway to Sustainability

Continue

Supporting innovation is necessary for sustainable results. Over the last 50 years, farmers have tripled global food production thanks to agricultural innovations. Forging the Innovation Pathway to Sustainability was a 2016-2018 Challenge Area that focused on understanding the barriers and processes that prevented the adoption of technology and research results into sustainable practices.

Urban Food Systems

Urban Food Systems

Continue

The 2016-2018 Urban Food Systems Challenge Area addressed feeding urban populations through urban and peri-urban agriculture and augmenting the capabilities of our current food system.

The Urban Food Systems Challenge Area continues this work and enhances our ability to feed urban populations.

Making My Plate Your Plate

Continue

FFAR’s 2016-2018 Making My Plate Your Plate Challenge Area focused on helping Americans meet the USDA 2015 Dietary Guideline recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption, including research to both produce and provide access to nutritious fruits and vegetables.

FFAR’s current Health-Agriculture Nexus Challenge Area supports innovative, systems-level approaches to reduce food and nutritional insecurity and improve human health in the US and globally.