FFAR Forms Six Advisory Councils

70 Council Members Strengthen the Foundation’s Network of Expertise with Producer, Industry, Government, Academic and Nonprofit Experience

WASHINGTON—The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research today announced the formation of six Advisory Councils, composed of leading experts across the food and agriculture industry.  Council members will advise Foundation staff and board members on program development and implementation, potential partnerships, and other avenues for advancing the organization’s mission to support innovative science addressing today’s food and agriculture challenges.

Each Advisory Council is led by a Chair, appointed to facilitate discussion and build consensus. The six Advisory Councils cover the topics listed below and are chaired by the following individuals:

  • Food System Innovation: Josette Lewis, Ph.D. | University of California, Davis
  • Nutrition and Healthy Food Choices: Laurian Unnevehr, Ph.D. | University of Illinois
  • Plant Efficiency: Jonathan Lynch, Ph.D. | Pennsylvania State University
  • Soil Health: Doug Karlen, Ph.D. | U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service
  • Sustainable Farm Animal Productivity, Resilience, and Health: Harvey Morgan Scott, D.V.M, Ph.D. | Texas A&M University
  • Water Use: Daniel Sonke, D.P.M. | Campbell Soup Company

Council members representing diverse industries, geographic areas, and professional backgrounds were selected from a competitive pool of applicants nominated through an open solicitation. They will serve two or three-year terms, and meet virtually three times per year.

“The new Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research Advisory Councils strengthen the Foundation’s expertise in six critical areas of food and agriculture,” said Dr. Sally Rockey, executive director of the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research. “I am confident that our new Council members, in close collaboration with the staff and Board, will add tremendous value to the Foundation’s programmatic development and continued growth.”

The Councils will assume a number of roles including participating in the peer review process and making recommendations on application and proposal alignment with strategic and scientific goals of the Foundation.

Advisory Council members were selected based on scientific, industry or other practical experience and knowledge.  View full list of Advisory Council members: https://foundationfar.org/advisory-councils/.

Overcoming Water Scarcity

Overcoming Water Scarcity

Continue

Agriculture uses 70 percent of the world’s accessible freshwater. FFAR’s 2016-2018 Overcoming Water Scarcity Challenge Area addressed water use efficiency in agriculture by developing water conservation and reuse technologies, improving crop and livestock breeds, creating improved agronomic practices, increasing the social and economic tractability of conservation practices and enhancing the efficacy of Extension services.

FFAR’s Sustainable Water Management Challenge Area builds on earlier work to increase water availability and water efficiency for agricultural use, reduces agricultural water pollution and develops water reuse technologies.

Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms

Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms

Continue

FFAR’s 2016-2018 Healthy Soils, Thriving Farms Challenge Area increased soil health by building knowledge, fueling innovation, and enabling adoption of existing or new innovative practices that improve soil health.

The Soil Health Challenge Area advances existing research and identifies linkages between farm productivity and soil health, while also addressing barriers to the adoption of soil health practices.

Protein Challenge

Protein Challenge

Continue

FFAR’s 2016-2018 Protein Challenge Area sought to improve the environmental, economic and social sustainability of diverse proteins.

The Advance Animal Systems challenge area supports sustainable animal production through environmentally sound productions practices and advancement in animal health and welfare. Additionally, the Next Generation Crops Challenge Area develops non-traditional crops, including plant-based proteins, and creates new economic opportunities for conventional crops to increase future crop diversity and farm profitability.

Food Waste and Loss

Food Waste and Loss

Continue

About 40 percent of food in the US, or $161 billion each year, is lost or wasted. FFAR’s 2016-2018 Food and Waste Loss Challenge Area addressed the social, economic and environmental impacts from food waste and loss through research that developed of novel uses for agricultural waste, improved storage and distribution, supported tracking and monitoring, minimized spoilage through pre- and post-harvest innovations and changed behaviors to reduce food waste

FFAR’s current Health-Agriculture Nexus Challenge Area addresses food waste and loss and supports innovative, systems-level approaches to reduce food and nutritional insecurity and improve human health in the US and globally.

Forging the Innovation Pathway to Sustainability

Continue

Supporting innovation is necessary for sustainable results. Over the last 50 years, farmers have tripled global food production thanks to agricultural innovations. Forging the Innovation Pathway to Sustainability was a 2016-2018 Challenge Area that focused on understanding the barriers and processes that prevented the adoption of technology and research results into sustainable practices.

Urban Food Systems

Urban Food Systems

Continue

The 2016-2018 Urban Food Systems Challenge Area addressed feeding urban populations through urban and peri-urban agriculture and augmenting the capabilities of our current food system.

The Urban Food Systems Challenge Area continues this work and enhances our ability to feed urban populations.

Making My Plate Your Plate

Continue

FFAR’s 2016-2018 Making My Plate Your Plate Challenge Area focused on helping Americans meet the USDA 2015 Dietary Guideline recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption, including research to both produce and provide access to nutritious fruits and vegetables.

FFAR’s current Health-Agriculture Nexus Challenge Area supports innovative, systems-level approaches to reduce food and nutritional insecurity and improve human health in the US and globally.