Awarded Grants
Below is a listing of our awarded grants that tackle big food and agriculture challenges.

Refine Results
Challenge Areas & Initiatives
Consortia
Program
Scientific Workforce Programs
Location
Year
Order

2 Grants found

A holistic approach to improving keel bone health of breeders and commercial layer hens

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $1,499,686

Total award amount   $2,999,372

Location   Davis, CA

Program   Layer Hen Keel Bone Health Program

Matching Funders   Hy-Line International; Open Philanthropy

Grantee Institution   University of California, Davis

This research is bringing an interdisciplinary approach to the complex, multi-faceted challenge of keel bone damage. The research team is aiming to decrease the occurrence of keel bone damage by examining the birds’ housing environments and assessing the key relation and role of genetics. The researchers are identifying genetic markers associated with keel bone damage in breeding flocks raised under different housing environments and improving genetic selection to promote resistance to keel bone fractures. They are also evaluating the effects of housing design interventions on the development, type and prevalence of keel bone damage. Finally, the researchers are exploring alternative housing designs and conducting economic analyses to determine the costs and gains from the proposed adjustments to breeding and housing designs.

Using the power of functional genomics and genetics to reduce keel bone damage

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $1,489,326

Total award amount   $3,991,105

Location   Edinburgh, UK

Program   Layer Hen Keel Bone Health Program

Matching Funders   Hy-Line International; Lohmann Breeders GmbH; Open Philanthropy; Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Universidad de Granada; University of Alberta

Grantee Institution   University of Edinburgh

The research consortium is using genetic selection to address keel damage. The team is using x-ray images and machine learning to refine and validate the measurements of bone quality and keel damage in living hens to inform the selection of hens to reduce keel bone damage. This work is also examining if breeding programs for improved keel health need to vary depending upon poultry housing design. The consortium’s work also is exploring the relationship of age at puberty on bone strength by manipulating diet and light to delay puberty and measuring the resulting effects on bone quality. Finally, they are determining whether a diet that produces lower homocysteine, an amino acid, increases collagen strength and improves keel quality.