Awarded Grants
Below is a listing of our awarded grants that tackle big food and agriculture challenges.

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58 Grants found

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An International Collaboration for Combating Fusarium Wilt in Cotton

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $750,000

Total award amount   $1,922,439

Location   Clemson, SC

Matching Funders   Clemson University, Cotton, Inc., Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Grantee Institution   Clemson University

Cotton farmers worldwide have long witnessed Fusarium wilt (FOV), a fungal disease that causes rapid wilting and sudden death of cotton plants in nearly all cotton growing regions of the world. FOV cannot be eradicated through biological or chemical treatments, threatening cotton production and farmers’ livelihoods. Clemson researchers are developing germplasm to combat Fusarium wilt, specifically wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum vasinfectum race 4 (FOV4), which infects Upland cotton. They are also collaborating with Australian scientists and using new breeding tools to determine if recently discovered FOV4 resistance genes in U.S. cotton can also provide resistance in Australian cotton.

Field trial of rice gene-edited rice for drought tolerance

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $25,000

Total award amount   $50,000

Location   Berkeley, CA

Matching Funders   Good Ventures Foundation

Grantee Institution   University of California, Berkeley

Rice is one of the world’s most important staple crops and some varieties are extremely water intensive. More frequent occurrences of severe drought threaten rice production as well as global nutritional security. University of California, Berkeley, researchers are conducting field trials of gene-edited rice lines—groups of similar plants—that in laboratory settings conserve more water more efficiently than non-edited, or wild-type, rice.

Elucidating the genetic basis for sub-tropical flowering in hemp

Year Awarded  2023

Total award amount   $840,000

Location   Ithaca, NY

Grantee Institution   Cornell University

Hemp growers have been largely limited to varieties of hemp cultivated in Canada or Europe, but these crops do not thrive in all growing regions of the U.S. Cornell University researchers aim to understand the genetic basis of photoperiod threshold, which is the amount of light a plant needs to achieve flowering and other types of development. Researchers will also use whole genome sequencing to understand the genetic basis for flowering time variation and develop molecular markers to speed breeding for southern-adapted cultivars. These selections will be further bred to produce cultivars with a photoperiod matched to North Carolina, Florida and similar locations.

Breeding and Characterizing New Cultivars of Grain and Fiber Hemp

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $750,000

Total award amount   $1,500,000

Location   Ithaca, NY

Matching Funders   International Hemp

Grantee Institution   Cornell University

Hemp growers have been largely limited to varieties of hemp cultivated in Canada or Europe, but these crops do not thrive in all growing regions of the U.S. Cornell University researchers are also developing varieties of hemp that will deliver higher yields, especially at lower latitudes in the U.S. The research team is developing new hemp cultivars using marker-assisted selection that show promise in southern latitudes and have specific desirable traits. Cornell breeders are selecting for late-flowering individuals grown in trials in New York, North Carolina and Florida that also produce high yields of CBD, which has never been achieved before.

Plant-XR: A New Generation of Breeding Tools for Extra-Resilient Crops

Year Awarded  2022

Location   Utrecht, the Netherlands

Matching Funders   CropXR, Dutch Research Council, National Growth Fund

Grantee Institution   CropXR

As the pace of climate change picks up, speeding the development of resilient crops is urgent. CropXR is building, supporting and facilitating a development pipeline for more resilient, sustainable and climate-adapted varieties of agricultural crops. The research combines plant biology, computational modelling and artificial intelligence to create computational, functional plant models to predict and guide rational, targeted breeding and cultivation strategies.

Assessment of the Available Literature and Gap Analysis on the Use of Industrial Hemp as an Animal Feed

Year Awarded  2022

FFAR award amount   $6,972

Total award amount   $13,944

Location   Lexington, KY

Matching Funders   International Hemp, University of Kentucky Research Foundation

Hemp grain and fiber have a favorable amino acid profile compared to other grains and excellent omega-3 fatty acid compounds, giving them potential as a feed additive for both companion pets and livestock. However, under current Food and Drug Administration and Center for Veterinary Medicine guidelines, hemp is prohibited for inclusion in the diets of livestock, primarily due to safety concerns of possible THC and other chemical transference to the animals or to humans through meat consumption. University of Kentucky researchers are identifying and organizing previous scientific studies using hemp as animal feed to find knowledge gaps that could identify future research opportunities and develop research goals that could more rapidly lead to federal approval of hemp grain and fiber as feed additives.

Multistate characterization of agronomic performance of hemp cultivars, including sterility of new triploid cultivars

Year Awarded  2022

FFAR award amount   $51,627

Total award amount   $103,254

Location   Raleigh, NC

Matching Funders   NC State University, Oregon CBD

Increased field production of grain and fiber hemp results in significant amounts of wind-dispersed pollen. Pollination of floral hemp grown for cannabinoids can result in reduced yield and unmarketable quality due to the presence of seeds, which is unacceptable in smokable flower. Consequently, farmers growing floral hemp require tools to minimize the threat of pollination. NC State University researchers are studying sterile varieties of hemp for their potential to retain sterility over multiple growing seasons, and gathering data on these varieties’ flowering and harvest, seed production, floral biomass and cannabinoid concentrations.

Breeding and Genetics of Disease Resistance, Flowering Time, and Cannabinoid Content in Hemp

Year Awarded  2022

FFAR award amount   $150,000

Total award amount   $300,000

Location   Ithaca, NY

Matching Funders   Cornell University, The Scotts Company LLC

Cornell researchers are focusing on breeding for traits that help adapt hemp to different regions and growing environments, including outdoor and controlled environments. Top priorities include understanding the genes controlling flowering time, mildew resistance and minor cannabinoid production in hemp. The researchers aim to develop molecular markers for the genes controlling these traits to facilitate breeding.

Analysis of Terpenes and Neutral Cannabinoids Using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometry and Genotyping of Hemp Using the SureSelect System

Year Awarded  2022

FFAR award amount   $251,000

Total award amount   $502,000

Location   Ithaca, NY

Matching Funders   Agilent Technologies, Cornell University

Cannabis can produce high levels of cannabinoids and terpenes, which help defend against pests and have potential economic, pharmacological and societal value. Mapping the genes in hemp that control the production of these compounds is a critical first step in developing genetic markers that can be used in breeding programs. Cornell researchers are using an Agilent Technologies mass spectrometry platform to examine the diversity of cannabinoids and terpenes produced by hemp, ultimately assisting breeding for defense against herbivores and for compounds with pharmacological and wellness value.

Impact of spectra and intensity of LED supplemental lighting on morphology, growth, flower yield, and phytochemical content of Cannabis Sativa

Year Awarded  2022

FFAR award amount   $100,000

Total award amount   $200,000

Location   Raleigh, NC

Matching Funders   The Scotts Company LLC

The electricity for lighting cannabis grown in controlled environments in the U.S. is estimated at $896 million annually. Energy-efficient LED adoption could result in 34 percent energy savings, but there is a lack of scientifically validated information on light intensity and quality for optimal yield and phytochemical—CBD and related cannabinoids—content. NC State researchers are focusing on the impact of UV, blue, green, red and far-red light and their interaction for nursery yield, flower yield, phytochemical concentration and profitability. This project will also reveal cannabis’ response to light intensity and provide information on how additional light affects yield and revenue.