Awarded Grants
Below is a listing of our awarded grants that tackle big food and agriculture challenges.

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376 Grants found

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Towards Production of Residue-Free Healthy Fruit Crops

Year Awarded  2018

FFAR award amount   $300,000

Total award amount   $600,000

Location   Prosser, WA

Matching Funders   WSU-Center for Precision and Automated Agricultural Systems, WSU- College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS), WSU-CAHNRS Biological Systems Engineering Department, WSU Graduate School

Timely insect pest management is critical for quality tree fruit and wine grape production. However, consumers are increasingly alarmed by synthetic pesticide, which leave residues on produce and contaminates the environment. Washington State University researchers are developing and evaluating alternative pest management technologies that aid conventional and organic growers in reducing their reliance on broad spectrum pesticides.

Toward Responsible Pacific Bluefin Tuna Mariculture in the United States: Captive Reproduction, Hatchery Research and Product

Year Awarded  2018

FFAR award amount   $945,735

Total award amount   $2,978,942

Location   West Des Moines, IA

Matching Funders   Ichthus Unlimited, LLC, Texas A&M, Spanish Institute of Oceanography, Illinois Soybean Foundation, San Diego Port

At only three percent of its original population, Pacific Bluefin Tuna are on the verge of being placed on the endangered species list. Ichthus Unlimited, LLC is cultivating Pacific Bluefin Tuna eggs to grow juvenile fish, which can then mature on tuna farms. Acquiring tuna eggs from hatcheries, rather than the wild, would reduce overfishing and help stabilize the wild population.

Value-Added and Nutritionally Superior Extruded Foods from Agricultural Waste Streams

Year Awarded  2018

FFAR award amount   $539,962

Total award amount   $1,080,767

Location   Ithaca, NY

Matching Funders   New York Apple Association, Cornell University

Much of fruit and vegetable skins, seeds, cores and stems left behind after food processing becomes a form of agricultural waste known as pomace, which has limited utility and harms the environment. Cornell University researchers are developing a technology to convert this waste into snack foods.

FFAR Awards $9.4 Million to Spur Next Leap in Agriculture: Improved Soil Health to Optimize Economic and Environmental Results for US Farmers

Year Awarded  2017

FFAR award amount   $9,400,000

Total award amount   $20,000,000

Location   Morrisville, NC

Matching Funders   General Mills, the Jeremy and Hannelore Grantham Environmental Trust, Midwest Row Crop Collaborative, Monsanto, Nestlé Purina PetCare Company, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Walmart Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation and individual donors

Soil health is a critical component of a productive and sustainable agricultural system. Farming practices that improve soil health can increase profitability while protecting natural resources like air and water for communities. The goal of this project is to support collaborative research and education that accelerates adoption and benefits of soil health management systems nationally.

Integrating Community and Modeling Efforts to Evaluate Impacts and Tradeoffs of Food System Interventions

Year Awarded  2017

FFAR award amount   $1,000,000

Total award amount   $2,000,000

Location   Ft. Collins, CO

Program   Tipping Points

Matching Funders   Colorado Food Policy Network, Colorado Food Systems Advisory Council, Colorado Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association, Colorado Potato Administrative Committee, Colorado Wheat Research Committee, Colorado State University, City/County of Denver, Nourish Colorado, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Kaiser Permanente

While city-level policies are reducing food insecurity in Denver, Colorado, the state is lagging behind. Colorado State University researchers are building a computational model of the current food system to evaluate the potential for city-based food system policies and initiatives to support similar efforts throughout the state.

Evaluating Food Access Strategies in Austin, Texas

Year Awarded  2017

FFAR award amount   $996,560

Total award amount   $2,114,226

Location   Austin, TX

Program   Tipping Points

Matching Funders   Austin Public Health

In Austin, Texas, the city funded Fresh for Less farm stands, mobile markets and healthy corner stores to increase access to healthy foods. Sustainable Food Center, Inc. is examining the effects of Fresh for Less food access points on fruit and vegetable purchasing and consumption, food security and obesity. The results will inform the best ways to implement and expand the Fresh for Less program.

Identifying Short-term Solutions for Managing Allium Leafminer in Allium

Year Awarded  2017

FFAR award amount   $65,000

Total award amount   $130,000

Location   Ithaca, NY

Program   Rapid Outcomes from Agricultural Research

Matching Funders   New York Farm Viability Institute

The Allium Leafminer (ALM), an invasive fly species, threatens Allium crops such as onions, garlic, leeks, scallions and chives. The emerging pest has the capacity to devastate entire fields. Cornell University researchers are identifying effective insecticides and tactics for controlling pest in Allium crops for both organic and conventional Allium production. The project is also developing best practices for predicting and scouting for ALM and arming growers with the latest information to prevent crop damage.

Addressing keel bone fractures in laying hens housed in cage-free aviary systems using nutrition and management interventions

Year Awarded  2017

FFAR award amount   $490,093

Total award amount   $490,093

Location   West Lafayette, IN

Matching Funders   Open Philanthropy Project

Keel, or breastbone fractures are painful and decrease egg production and are a common concern for cage-free hens. Purdue University researchers are assessing the impact of nutritional interventions on the gut microbiome and testing management interventions to reduce keel bone fractures in laying hens housed in cage-free systems.

Adaptive Multi-Paddock (AMP) Grazing Research in the U.S. Southeast

Year Awarded  2017

FFAR award amount   $1,250,000

Total award amount   $2,500,000

Location   Tempe, AZ

Matching Funders   McDonalds

Researchers are investigating whether Adaptive Multi-Paddock (AMP) grazing, in relation to widespread continuous grazing practices, contributes to measurable differences in overall soil health, environmental sustainability and farmer profitability within the U.S. Southeast.

A Practical Phenotypic Solution to Reduce Keel & Skeletal Bone Damage in Laying Hens

Year Awarded  2017

FFAR award amount   $243,296

Total award amount   $486,594

Location   Edinburgh, UK

Matching Funders   Open Philanthropy Project

Keel, or breastbone fractures, which cause pain and decrease egg production, are a challenge to raising hens in cage-free housing systems. To improve the health and productivity of egg-laying hens and prevent these fractures, University of Edinburgh researchers are developing an x-ray-based measurement system for on-farm use to breed hens with stronger bones.