Awarded Grants
Below is a listing of our awarded grants that tackle big food and agriculture challenges.

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402 Grants found

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Project Ella

Year Awarded  2023

Total award amount   $495,990

Location   Leiden, The Netherlands

Program   Egg-Tech Prize

Matching Funders   Open Philanthropy

Grantee Institution   In Ovo

Commercially, chicks can only be sexed after they hatch, requiring producers to devote time and resources to incubating male chicks, only to cull them. Yearly, over six billion male layer chicks are culled when hatched because there is no commercial use for them. This research is further developing and scaling in-ovo sexing technology that measures a naturally occurring biomarker within the embryos’ waste fluid. This fluid differs between the sexes, allowing sorting the eggs by sex on the ninth day of development with high accuracy.

Modeling for genomic, blood & microbiological markers for liver abscesses in fed beef cattle

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $300,000

Total award amount   $633,462

Location   Lubbock, TX

Matching Funders   Genus ABS, Hy-Plains Feedyard, LLC, Texas Tech University, Veterinary Research & Consulting Services, LLC

Grantee Institution   Texas Tech University

Liver abscesses in cattle are a significant problem for beef and dairy cow producers, jeopardizing animals’ health and costing producers approximately $30 million annually. The condition occurs when bacteria cross from an animal’s gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and accumulate in the liver. This research is investigating genetic markers and biomarkers that contribute to the formation of liver abscesses to allow producers to make more informed breeding and management decisions to reduce susceptibility in cattle and reduce reliance on antimicrobial treatments.

Understanding liver abscess pathogenesis & risk-factors of feedlot cattle reared in conventional beef versus dairy management systems

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $300,000

Total award amount   $600,340

Location   Canyon, TX

Matching Funders   West Texas A&M University

Grantee Institution   West Texas A&M University

Liver abscesses in cattle are a significant problem for beef and dairy cow producers, jeopardizing animals’ health and costing producers approximately $30 million annually. The condition occurs when bacteria cross from an animal’s gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and accumulate in the liver. This research is evaluating liver abscess development in feedlot cattle reared in conventional beef versus dairy management systems to provide insight into liver abscess pathogenesis and identify biomarkers that assess the risk of liver abscessation.

Metabolomic analysis of blood plasma to identify unique biomarkers indicative of liver abscesses

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $248,641

Total award amount   $497,282

Location   Manhattan, KS

Matching Funders   Cargill, Kansas State University, Tyson Foods, United Animal Health

Grantee Institution   Kansas State University

Liver abscesses in cattle are a significant problem for beef and dairy cow producers, jeopardizing animals’ health and costing producers approximately $30 million annually. The condition occurs when bacteria cross from an animal’s gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and accumulate in the liver. This research is evaluating a comprehensive ‘biochemical fingerprinting’ in blood plasma collected from beef cattle with and without abscesses in the liver. Unique biomolecules in the blood of cattle with liver abscesses can help detect the onset and progression of liver abscesses and can aid evaluating antibiotic alternatives for prevention.

Associations between feeding & management practices of beef-on-dairy cattle from birth to harvest with liver abscesses

Year Awarded  2023

Location   Manhattan, KS

Matching Funders   Animal Welfare Consulting and Research, Cargill, Deer Creek Feeding, LLC, Hy-Plains Feedyard, LLC, Syracuse Dairy, Tyson Foods, Veterinary Research & Consulting Services, LLC

Grantee Institution   Kansas State University

Liver abscesses in cattle are a significant problem for beef and dairy cow producers, jeopardizing animals’ health and costing producers approximately $30 million annually. The condition occurs when bacteria cross from an animal’s gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and accumulate in the liver. It is commonly controlled by treating entire groups of animals with antibiotics – including healthy ones – because it is difficult to determine which animals are infected. This research is evaluating the associations between feeding and management practices of beef-on-dairy cattle for which it is commonly believed the rate of liver abscesses is two to three times greater than beef cattle crossed with other beef cattle.

Promoting antimicrobial stewardship through improved understanding of how feedlot cattle are classified based on BRD risk

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $124,948

Total award amount   $249,911

Location   Manhattan, KS

Matching Funders   Kansas State University, Beef Marketing Research, Cactus Research, Five Rivers Cattle Feeding, Hy-Plains Feedyard, Innovative Livestock Services, Veterinary Research & Consulting Services, Zoetis

Grantee Institution   Kansas State University

The livestock industry is plagued by bovine respiratory disease (BRD), an infectious condition that can spread through a herd and comprises an estimated 80% of antibiotic treatments. Kansas State University researchers are collecting data to improve understanding of how feedlot cattle are classified based on BRD risk. The data can be used to comprehensively assess health risks and interventions, and as a result, optimize health management strategies for specific cattle populations, improve animal well-being and encourage more efficient antimicrobial use.

Acoustic Monitoring to Support Mass Cattle Treatment Decisions

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $50,000

Total award amount   $104,128

Location   Atlanta, GA

Matching Funders   Cactus Research, Ergense, Five Rivers Cattle Feeding, McDonald’s Corporation, Veterinary Research & Consulting Services

Grantee Institution   Ergense Inc.

The livestock industry is plagued by bovine respiratory disease (BRD), an infectious condition that can spread through a herd and comprises an estimated 80% of antibiotic treatments. The standard procedure for cattle arriving at a feedlot is to isolate and observe them, after which workers decide if the entire pen should receive antibiotic treatment based on various animal health factors. To reduce treatment subjectivity, this research is developing an audio monitoring technique that uses machine learning to analyze acoustic signatures of animal vocalizations to inform the BRD treatment decision.

Developing a model protocol for tracking antibiotic use & AMR surveillance across a large-scale commercial swine production system

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $202,555

Total award amount   $405,111

Location   Pipestone, MN

Matching Funders   Pipestone, National Pork Board

Grantee Institution   Pipestone

The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) is tracking antimicrobial resistance (AMR) data at the level of the meat case, the harvest facility and across cases of human foodborne illness; however, no such effort exists at the level of the swine farm. This project is developing a protocol to track antibiotic use across large-scale commercial swine production systems and compare it in real-time with its respective on-farm antibiotic use to enhance the marketability of pork, improve animal welfare and launch the U.S. swine industry to the forefront of AMR surveillance globally.

An International Collaboration for Combating Fusarium Wilt in Cotton

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $750,000

Total award amount   $1,922,439

Location   Clemson, SC

Matching Funders   Clemson University, Cotton, Inc., Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Grantee Institution   Clemson University

Cotton farmers worldwide have long witnessed Fusarium wilt (FOV), a fungal disease that causes rapid wilting and sudden death of cotton plants in nearly all cotton growing regions of the world. FOV cannot be eradicated through biological or chemical treatments, threatening cotton production and farmers’ livelihoods. Clemson researchers are developing germplasm to combat Fusarium wilt, specifically wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum vasinfectum race 4 (FOV4), which infects Upland cotton. They are also collaborating with Australian scientists and using new breeding tools to determine if recently discovered FOV4 resistance genes in U.S. cotton can also provide resistance in Australian cotton.

Field trial of rice gene-edited rice for drought tolerance

Year Awarded  2023

FFAR award amount   $25,000

Total award amount   $50,000

Location   Berkeley, CA

Matching Funders   Good Ventures Foundation

Grantee Institution   University of California, Berkeley

Rice is one of the world’s most important staple crops and some varieties are extremely water intensive. More frequent occurrences of severe drought threaten rice production as well as global nutritional security. University of California, Berkeley, researchers are conducting field trials of gene-edited rice lines—groups of similar plants—that in laboratory settings conserve more water more efficiently than non-edited, or wild-type, rice.